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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
boehner, who have already openly said, no increases in tax rates? >> well, you have to splinter off some republicans, in the senate it will be easier because you just have to get to 60. you might pass the december 31st deadline where you have a few more democrats in the senate. but the problem is always going to be the house. i think there may be a bargain in the -- in the side of coming to republicans and saying, here are cuts. but the price of those cuts will be that 2%. republicans will face a very tough choice in just a very short time. are they the ones that are going to be responsible for giving 98% of americans tax hikes? do the republicans want to be known as the party that raised your taxes for everybody but 2%? >> right. and i think, martin -- >> so, the 2% solution may be a noose around the republicans' neck. >> i think the republicans have little leverage. not just for that reason but a couple of other reasons. if you consider the fact that taxes are at 15% of gdp, spending is at 24%, even the paul ryan budget proposes we only reduce spending to 20% of gdp. that means five pe
that is on the table for democrats and republicans and that is the president and speaker of the house, john boehner and how they are going about this discussion as far as the bush tax cuts and america's sort of fiscal future. now, mark, i'm curious to hear your thoughts on this. first play sound from president obama and john boehner yesterday talking about doing the delicate dance of revenue raraisers. >> i'm not going to extend tax cuts for the wealthiest 2%. how you make up the trillion dollars just by closing loopholes and deductions, the math tends not work. >> i've outlined a framework how both parties can work together to avert the fiscal cliff without raising tax rates. ways to put revenue on the table without increasing tax rates. >> mark a baby version of the themes we've talked about before, which is to say you have a hard line part of the republican party then the deal making part of the republican party and the democrats. how do you think this turns out? can john boehner, do you think john boehner can corral or quiet the more radical elements of the republican party to come to the table
isn't serious. it's a joke. a joke. >> house speaker john boehner has been far milder in this rhetoric. according to politico, some house republicans might consider a tax hike on millionaires. many republican lawmakers privately concede that the 2012 election left them far short of a mandate on taxes. and if urged by democrats to raise rates on the megawealthy, they will have a tough time resisting. for the record, president obama's position sounds much more in line with senator sanders' way of thinking. >> there are some tough things that have to be done, but there's a way of doing this that does not hurt middle class families, that does not hurt our seniors, doesn't hurt families with disabled kids. >> let's bring in ruth conif, political editor for the progressive magazine. also with us tonight, e.j. dionne, msnbc contributor, "washington post" columnist and author of the book "our divided political heart." great to have both of you with us tonight. ruth, you first. you know, this could set up to be a moment of real disappointment for liberals if the democrats can't close the deal.
passed already, with those rates and john boehner responded. >> the senate has already passed a law like this. democrats in the house are ready to pass a law like this and i hope republicans in the house come on board, too. we should not hold the middle class hostage while we debate tax cuts for the wealthy. >> i think in stead of the house moving on the senate bill, the senate ought to move on the house bill. >> so the debate has been engaged. it's going to be an interesting conversation on friday to get it started. >> that's right. he'll have the senate leaders and house leaders over to talk about this. one of the things that was so clear from that press conference was that the president is saying let's move this forward, let's move this forward now. he is certainly realizing that when you look at the four years that he has ahead of him, really it about the next 18 months to two years. that's when he has a mandate that, when he has political capital to spend. quickly he also wants to forestall some of these tax hikes that could come as early as january. john boehner initially said, lis
of congress. republicans john boehner and mitch mcconnell and democrats nancy pelosi and harry reid. >> we had a very constructive meeting with the president to talk about america's fiscal problem. >> we all know something has to be done. >> it was good. i feel confident that a solution may be in sight. >> we're prepared to put revenue on the table, provided we fix the real problem. >> tax hikes and spending cuts could go into effect simultaneously if no deal is reached on the fiscal cliff by the end of the year, both sides have said they are willing to compromise. house speaker boehner says republicans realize that neither side will get everything it wants. >>> exactly one week after he abruptly resigned as head of the cia, david petraeus was back on capitol hill. he met yesterday behind closed doors to brief lawmakers on the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. according to lawmakers who were there, petraeus now says the attack was an act of terrorism and not the result of a spontaneous anti-western demonstration as initially reported. four americans died in the benghazi
are already digging in their heels. speaker boehner, senator minority leader mitch mcconnell, paul ryan. all of them saying they will fight the president on taxes. all of them saying the president doesn't have a mandate. but president obama has something to say about that. >> i have one mandate. i have a mandate to help middle class families and families that are working hard to try to get into the middle class. that's my mandate. >> this is a clear message. it's what americans voted for a week ago. are you sure you want this fight, republicans? democrat from pennsylvania chuck fatah and ezra klein, msnbc policy analyst. he's writing about the fight over taxes today and the piece is called "the big question: how, not whether, to raise taxes." thank you for joining me tonight. >> thank you. >> good to be here. >> congressman, do you think republicans will make a deal or is this 2010 with the tea party all over again? >> well, what the public needs to understand is the income tax system is not fair to them. there is a report done by the congress each year by the joint committee on taxation. sh
. they weren't fighting for the top jobs. that's going to stay john boehner. they're actually fighting for the number four job in the house. the contest was tom price against one of the precious few republican women in the house, cathy mcmorris rodgers. and there were some interesting politics at work here. miss mcmorris rodgers had the support of speaker john boehner, but tom price had the support of this guy, the republican party's vice presidential nominee, paul ryan. in the end, it was cathy mcmorris rodgers who won. paul ryan's guy lost. and so even as they lose the presidency, thanks to a devastating gender gap in the polls, and at the same time they send even fewer republican women to congress than were there before, republicans did today pick for this small, low-profile national republican number four leadership role an actual woman. and that's the best they've ever done. that's the highest ranking gop woman there has ever been in the house. back over on the senate side, republicans are faced with a dilemma set up for them by john mccain, as i was just discussing with bill burt
boehner. i mean they are the most important players as to whether we get a result. secondly, i've said from day one, i've been saying it for two years, the most important piece of this, andrea, really is medicare because as you look at glen hubbard, as you look at others talking about all these things, the two are intertwined. in other words, as we see true medicare reforms and you see a real solution to medicare, where people know that we've put this behind us and we've dealt with it, i think you see the dial change as it relates to revenue. so, you know, i've been discussing revenues now for at least two years. i do think republicans are open to revenues that are put in place and a pro growth way, but i think people want to see that we've actually dealt with the problem. we haven't generated more revenues without solving the fundamental problems we have and we have what we want to do is put ourselves on a path towards fiscal solvency. i think the key here really is, medicare and to the extent you dial that up and solve it, i think you also dial the other dial which is revenues and i
when you saw nancy pelosi out there. you saw john boehner out there saying we are hopeful we can get a deal done. and the market had a positive reaction to that. yet it lost that upside throughout the day, teetered back and forth between positive and negative territory. finally, closing the day out positive, so perhaps that suggests that maybe we are a little bit closer. but here's the thing, randi, they've got to get something done. they've got to solve this issue. because if not, the consequences are severe. >> but you listen to some people, and they suggest that fears of fallen off the cliff are overblown. what are the real consequences here? >> the real consequences are another recession. i mean, i can tell you every ceo that i'm talking to right now says i'm not making major decisions. i'm waiting. i'm standing by the sidelines. i can't hire a lot of people, i can't invest in a lot of infrastructure because i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next 45 days. i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next three months. so there's a lot of holdup. now,
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)